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Perrin and the Way of the Leaf
#1
Perrin is and has always been my favourite character in the books, not just because he is wolfkin (haha), but because of his ethos and character conflict. The war between the man he is with the man he must be.

Tor published this article yesterday on pacifism and Perrin's inner conflicts and justifications with it in the series. Aram was an influence for my old Tinker Asha'man Araya (although unlike Aram, Araya did not take the decision upon himself, it was instead thrust upon him). It's a theme I've always found compelling. 

The things we are willing to defend, and how, is obviously a pretty hot topic right now. I don't intend to open a political debate (we should never be silent, but that's not what any of us come here for). However, this resonated with me this morning, so I wanted to share it. Aside from a snippet at the end, it is just about the books.

I'll leave you with a Tolkien quote from the Two Towers. 

“I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, 
nor the arrow for its swiftness, 
nor the warrior for his glory. 
I love only that which they defend.”
"A river is water in its loveliest form; rivers have life and sound and movement and infinity of variation, rivers are veins of the earth  through which the lifeblood returns to the heart."
Roderick Haig-Brown
[Image: nimthallethe.jpg]
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#2
Good article. 

The same conflict within was the basis for Vladamir, a Lord of Shienar who by birth is thrust into responsibility to protect against monsters of the Dark One through war. For the Shienarans, it is their identity. Except Vladamir hated it. He was ostracized for his beliefs. For if a Lord of Shienar did not engage in the fight, the Blight would swallow them. 

Of course the story carried him away from Shienar to become a Warder. But even then he did not escape the conflict as he served an AS of the Green. Though he was loyal to her and would lay down his life for her as he would have the people of his Keep, Fal Sion, he wished he could have been bonded by a Brown or White instead. 

This story is also Jai’s. Though the Taint escalated and complicated the conflict, it was with a different angle. He seeks the violence as a connection to his identity. As a protector of others who by destiny walks a fine line with darkness. He loves the sword because it gives him worth. When Jai’s swird was melted by the M’Hael, he lost his worth and purpose. 

Incidentally, that Tolkien quote was in Vlad’s signature on his account. *grin
One of my favorites. 
Yes I’ve read LotR. I read books. Sometimes. Hah.
Only darkness shows you the light.


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#3
Vlad always made me feel incredibly sad. I think he and Malaika would have found a lot of common ground had they ever interacted more; they both had a very quiet approach to life. She was used for war against her will but always found meaning in people and peace. Though she never understood warders or their use (well, she did, but she did not accept that another could or should lay down their life for hers) so his particularly circumstance would have been a puzzle to her too. I never got to finish her arc, but I like to think she did eventually find her own peace (and accepted that she did have inherent worth as a person). I'd like to think Vlad did too. Not that he seemed depressed in the same way Malaika was when the site died, but he didn't seem wholly fulfilled either.

Man Vs himself is thought provoking, and broadly speaking they're often the stories/characters that stay with me longest. One of the reasons I love Jai so much. Also why I will never forgive you for the sword. 

It's been a long time since I read lotr so it really wouldn't surprise me if Vlad's sig is why I remember the quote. It is a good one.
"A river is water in its loveliest form; rivers have life and sound and movement and infinity of variation, rivers are veins of the earth  through which the lifeblood returns to the heart."
Roderick Haig-Brown
[Image: nimthallethe.jpg]
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